Loading Events
This event has passed.

Laurentian University’s COVID-19 vaccination policy is in effect for those attending in person: https://laurentian.ca/COVID-19/vaccine

 

Title:

Treating post-stroke deficits with neuromodulation and telerehabilitation approaches

Abstract:

Stroke is a leading cause of adult disability. Although survival has improved in recent years, this means that more people than ever are living with long-term deficits affecting motor function, language, and cognition. Improving the outcomes for stroke survivors depends on increasing the availability of at-home therapy to provide the necessary daily intensity, and increasing the impact of therapy hours through optimal promotion of adaptive brain plasticity. Recent work in our lab addresses both aspects. I will show data on how computerized interventions for language rehabilitation can bring about improvements similar to those obtained in intensive residential aphasia rehabilitation programs, with only sporadic therapist contact. Our current collaboration with iRegained aims to expand this approach to motor rehabilitation. I will discuss leading theories of the mechanisms underlying long-term post-stroke impairments and their mitigation. Using a combination of electromagnetic brain imaging and brain stimulation, our lab has identified signatures of disrupted function in cortex that is affected but not destroyed by stroke, and has shown that these abnormalities can be partly reversed by brain stimulation, bringing lasting behavioural benefits. I will also discuss emerging evidence on adaptive and maladaptive interactions between the affected and unaffected hemispheres of the brain in stroke patients.

Speaker:

Dr. Meltzer’s research investigates the neural basis of language processing, based largely on measurements of the brain’s electrical activity. His lab aims to improve treatment of stroke and dementia using automatized therapy, pharmacology, and brain stimulation.

Date/Time:

Friday, November 26th from 12:00 – 1:00pm

Location: CROSH Lab (Laurentian University Ben Avery Building – B216)

or via Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88147159717